EKKLESIA THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 
2012 ACADEMIC CATALOG

Purpose

Ekklesia Theological Seminary is a church-based seminary that exists to advance the kingdom of God by equipping godly men for the ministry of the gospel of Jesus Christ. 

Vision

The vision for Ekklesia Theological Seminary was birthed out of the desire for theological education to be reconnected to the local church. Albert Mohler, President of The Southern Baptist Theological Seminary, said, “The transformation of theology into an academic discipline more associated with the university than the church has been one of the most lamentable developments of the last several centuries.” Ekklesia Theological Seminary seeks to contribute to the reversal of this trend. 

Along with connecting the seminary to the local church, Ekklesia seeks to provide greater accessibility for those who formerly were not able to access such theological education. It has been pointed out that more than half of Southern Baptist pastors do not have a seminary education. Ekklesia seeks to address this need, not only for those of the Baptist persuasion, but also for those of various backgrounds.

The vision for Ekklesia Seminary includes the idea that theological training of the present and future leadership of local churches will bring a regional impact on churches as their leadership is better equipped for biblical leadership. 

Distinctives Ministry

Because Ekklesia Theological Seminary is church-based, academic seriousness is united to ministerial passion. We are educating for ministry in the context of ministry.

Mentoring

In addition to high academic standards, a priority is placed on the personal and spiritual development of the student. Practical training is promoted through mentoring relationships with pastors or professors. An approved mentoring relationship is required for all students. 

Methods:

•Cultivation of quality reading habits

•Development of research, rhetoric and writing skills

•Robust debate and exchange of ideas 

•Participation in meaningful ministry activity

Emphases

The emphasis of Ekklesia Theological Seminary is upon developing calling, character, and competence in men. Calling is developed through improvement of abilities; character is developed through improvement of devotion to God; and competence is developed through knowledge, understanding, and wisdom. Ekklesia desires to bring together a heart for God, academic excellence, and competence in service of God and others. The function of Ekklesia is to cultivate God-given gifts. This will be accomplished through Biblical instruction, study of past and contemporary movements in Christian history, theological studies, and the improvement of communication, as well as, leadership skills.

Available Tracks

Master of Divinity Degree

This degree is primarily designed for those wishing to be an elder, full or part-time pastor, missionary, or other such leadership position. This consists of completing 96 credit hours of courses and fulfilling the requirements set forth by the seminary. 

Master of Arts Degree

This degree is for Christian men who do not aspire to an elder equivalent position but who do desire further theological training. This consists of completing 50 credit hours and fulfilling the requirements set forth by the seminary.Individual courses may be taken for credit or audited without having to complete the entire degree program. Men not possessing undergraduate degrees may gain admission to the seminary. If such a student should attain a baccalaureate degree he may petition the seminary in writing seeking approval to receive credit toward the Master’s degree for courses taken at Ekklesia.

Course Descriptions

Exegetical Theology

ET 101 Old Testament Survey: Genesis – Joshua (3 hours). An introduction to the Pentateuch and Joshua, including an examination of critical, historical, hermeneutical, and theological issues.

ET 102 Old Testament Survey: Judges to Poets (3 hours). An introduction to the Historical writings and the Poets, from Judges through the Poets, including an examination of critical, historical, hermeneutical, and theological issues.

ET 103 Old Testament Survey: Isaiah to Malachi (3 hours). An introduction to the Prophets, including an examination of critical, historical, hermeneutical, and theological issues.

ET 104 Old Testament Theology: This course focuses on the historical context and major theological themes of Old Testament teaching.

ET 201 New Testament Survey: The Life and Teachings of Jesus (3 hours). An introduction to the Gospels, including an examination of critical, historical, hermeneutical, and theological issues.

ET 202 New Testament Survey: Johannine Literature (3 hours).An introduction to the Johannine literature, including the Gospel of John, First, Second, and Third John, and Revelation, including an examination of critical, historical, hermeneutical, and theological issues.

ET 203 New Testament Survey: Pauline Epistles (3 hours).An introduction to the Pauline Epistles, including an examination of critical, historical, hermeneutical, and theological issues.

ET 204 New Testament Theology: This course focuses on the historical context and major theological themes of New Testament teaching.

ET 301 Introduction to Biblical Hebrew (3 hours).An introduction to Biblical Hebrew, including basic grammar, syntax, and vocabulary.

ET 302 Hebrew Syntax and Translation (3 hours).A study of Hebrew syntax, including translation and exegesis of OT passages. The course will move beyond elementary Hebrew by covering issues of syntax at the word, phrase, and especially, the clause, sentence, and discourse levels. The course is intended to bridge the gap between elementary Hebrew and advanced exegesis courses. Prerequisite: ET 301 or advanced placement.

ET 303 Hebrew Exegesis 2 hoursA review of Hebrew grammar and syntax. A study of syntax selected texts with a view to implementing exegesis. Prerequisite: ET711 or advanced placement.

ET 401 Introduction to New Testament Greek (3 hours). An introduction to Biblical Greek, including basic grammar, syntax, and vocabulary. 

ET 402 Greek Syntax and Translation (3 hours).A study of Greek syntax, including  translation, sentence diagramming and exegesis of NT passages. Prerequisite: ET 501 or advanced placement.

ET 403 Greek Exegesis (2 hours)An exegesis of selected passages with attention to literary structure.Prerequisites: ET 611 or advanced placement.

ET 501 Biblical Interpretation (3 hours). An introduction to the principles of biblical interpretation, including a survey of the history of interpretation. Special attention is given to the NT writers’ use of OT passages, as well as to common hermeneutical fallacies.

Historical Theology

HT 104 Historical Theology I: A study of Christian creeds and confessions from the post-apostolic period to AD 600.

HT 105 Historical Theology II: A study of Christian creeds and confessions from AD 600 to the Reformation.

HT 106 Historical Theology III: A study of Christian creeds and confessions from the Reformation to present. 

Systematic Theology

ST 101 Christian Theology I (3 hours). A systematic study of the general and special revelation, and the doctrine of God.

ST 102 Christian Theology II (3 hours). A systematic study of the doctrines of God, man, Christ, and the Holy Spirit.

ST 103 Christian Theology III (3 hours). A systematic study of the doctrines of redemption, the church, and eschatology.

ST 201 Apologetics (3 hours). Various approaches to the apologetic task will be investigated. Attention will be given to the systematic and rational defense of the Christian faith against many serious contemporary challenges. Topics include such areas as tests for truth, a critique of relativism and pluralism, the problem of miracles, and thehistoricity of the Christian faith.

ST 301 Ethics (3 hours). An introduction to Christian ethics, with attention given to methodology, biblical foundations, types of Christian ethical thought, and Christian responsibility in relation to current social problems.

ST 401 Introduction to Christian Philosophy and Logic (3 hours) A study, in historical perspective, of the basic issues in the philosophy of religion.

Practical Theology

PT 101 Christian Preaching (3 hours). A systematic and practical study regarding the nature and method of a Pastor’s work preparing sermons.

PT 201 Practical Theology I: A study of the practical role of pastors in local churches.

PT 202 Practical Theology II: A study of the practical application of Christian doctrine to a wide variety of issues.

PT 203 Introduction to Biblical Counseling (3 hours). A systematic and practical study of the theology, principles, and methodology of biblical counseling.

PT 301 Evangelism (2 hours). A systematic and practical study of the theology and practice of biblical evangelism.

PT 401 Missions (2 hours).A systematic and practical study of the theology and practice of biblical missions.

PT 501 The Pastor’s Home (2 hours). A study of biblical teaching regarding marriage and family relationships. Evaluates roles, marital relationships, parenting skills, the relationship between the home and the church, the home as aneducational agency, and the special problems faced by pastors and their families. 

Mentoring Requirements (No Credit): 

Personal mentoring of the students is a requirement. One of the student's pastors must provide general oversight of his training and serve as his mentor. 

Mentoring requirements for current elders/pastors will be fulfilled in consultation with the school. It is understood that some pastors are the primary leaders in their church and thus do not have a leader over them to fulfill a mentoring relationship or may have extensive ministry experience and are primarily desiring academic skills or advancement. In these cases, regular consultations with the school or other godly leaders will suffice for the mentoring requirements. This will be determined in consultation with the school. The mentoring experience will include, but is not limited to, the following: Preaching/Teaching Experience Worship Leadership ExperienceChristian Leadership Experience